The Humour Is on Me Now

Discussion about Ruby Murray.
Bernie Burgess
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2005 12:45 am
Location: Sutton Coldfield

Re: The Humour Is on Me Now

Post by Bernie Burgess »

Bravo Graham

Thank you for coming up with the answers. Very well done. I knew that a 'Lilter' was featured but I no longer have any of Ruby's L.P.s, I gave them to my daughter so that they can be kept in the family for safety.

Lykes
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon May 08, 2017 4:59 am

Re: The Humour Is on Me Now

Post by Lykes »

Timmer wrote:
Wed May 03, 2017 6:23 am
Thanks, Bernie. I'm really these! :)
Me too. Lol!
Last edited by Lykes on Sat Oct 07, 2017 12:28 am, edited 2 times in total.

User avatar
Timmer
Site Admin
Posts: 165
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2005 10:24 pm
Contact:

Re: The Humour Is on Me Now

Post by Timmer »

Lykes wrote:
Mon May 15, 2017 12:54 am
Me too. Lol!
Good to have you with us, Lykes!

Bernie Burgess
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2005 12:45 am
Location: Sutton Coldfield

Re: The Humour Is on Me Now

Post by Bernie Burgess »

I assume that everyone is familiar with an Irish dish called 'Champ'. It's mashed potatoes with Spring Onions mixed in. Not so long ago it was some times made with Stinging Nettles in place of Scallions (Spring Onions) - doesnt bare thinking of does it???

There is an expression, rather an unkind one . . . An Irishman is someone who thinks twice before he says nothing. I'll get my coat . . .

Bernie Burgess
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2005 12:45 am
Location: Sutton Coldfield

Re: The Humour Is on Me Now

Post by Bernie Burgess »

I've just been chatting to a pal of mine, an Irish comedian called Dusty Young and he came out with a nice line which made me smile - "A Hypochondriac is someone who enjoys BAD health, - How irish is that?

User avatar
Timmer
Site Admin
Posts: 165
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2005 10:24 pm
Contact:

Re: The Humour Is on Me Now

Post by Timmer »

Bernie Burgess wrote:
Sun May 21, 2017 1:58 am
I assume that everyone is familiar with an Irish dish called 'Champ'. It's mashed potatoes with Spring Onions mixed in. Not so long ago it was some times made with Stinging Nettles in place of Scallions (Spring Onions) - doesnt bare thinking of does it???
Here in Portland, Oregon, my wife and subscribe to a CSA. (Community Supported Agriculture.) It's an urban farm a couple of miles away. With their most recent delivery arrived some nettles.

Now I know what to do! Thanks a lot, Champ. :D

Bernie Burgess
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2005 12:45 am
Location: Sutton Coldfield

Re: The Humour Is on Me Now

Post by Bernie Burgess »

You are very adventurous Timmer. It really doesn't appeal to me.

On reflection, back in history Sir Walter Raleigh SUPPOSEDLY brought potatoes back to England (he didn't really, somebody beat him to it) and we accepted digging these items out of the ground and eating them. I am now feverishly trying to find the correct spelling of 'Praties' the Irish word for potatoes. In the lyric in Galway Bay... 'and the women in the 'Uplands diggin' Praties speak a language that the strangers do not know (Irish Gaelic)... Mashed potato in Irish is - 'Bruitin' and boiled potatoes are called 'Pratai Bruite'

Similarly Raleigh was also SUPPOSEDLY responsible for bringing tobacco back to England - and what did we do with that?. . we rolled it up .....put it in our mouths and set fire to it ...... and we think the Irish are funny.

Bernie Burgess
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2005 12:45 am
Location: Sutton Coldfield

Re: The Humour Is on Me Now

Post by Bernie Burgess »

In the hope of raising a smile . . . .

Riley and Murphy had a confrontation and decided on a dual - pistols at 10 paces. MURPHY was a thin man and Riley was fat (Large). Riley said "look at the size of you campared to the size of me" and to make things even Murphy would have to stand twice as far away from him as he was to Murphy. Riley then came up with a comprimise and took a chalk from his pocket and drew two lines evenly down the front of himself and said "Any bullets outside of that won't count" . .

The old ones are the best.

Bernie Burgess
Posts: 1051
Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2005 12:45 am
Location: Sutton Coldfield

Re: The Humour Is on Me Now

Post by Bernie Burgess »

I have had to edit the previous posting to make better sense of the gag.

martin73
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun Dec 10, 2017 4:43 am

Re: The Humour Is on Me Now

Post by martin73 »

It is quite a common phrase in rural Ireland amongst the older folk, maybe 70 and over... It basically means Ruby is doing it now and nothing is going to stop her, now that she is in the mood to marry....a bit like how it was with Ruby and Bernie.:-) You might also hear them say "Ruby is in a bad humour today" meaning they are in a bad mood, irritable etc. Or "I don't know what kind of a humour was on that fella last night", meaning he was bad temprered, argumentative, moody etc.

Another colloquial Irish phrase was used by Ruby's mother when she commented on "Ruby's notions" meaning strange ideas, thoughts etc. Along with this a person might say "Ruby took a notion and left the party and went home". This means she got an idea in her head, perhaps that somebody had insulted or upset her, which could be true or just perceived, and left.

Hope this makes sense as I'm not great at explaining things.

martin73
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun Dec 10, 2017 4:43 am

Re: The Humour Is on Me Now

Post by martin73 »

Hi Bernie, on the subject of spuds, the pronunciation of the gaelic word for mashed potatoes is "Bruisey". This is mashed potatoes with butter and milk. In county Mayo and the west of Ireland it is sometimes called "Cally" but not sure of the correct spelling. Oh and it is "praties"

martin73
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun Dec 10, 2017 4:43 am

Re: The Humour Is on Me Now

Post by martin73 »

Me again friends taking over, and you are making me hungry. Champ is a mainly northern dish and in the border counties like Monaghan. In the south and west it is called Colcannon. It's mashed potatoes and spring onions and butter and it's very nice. Some people mash in cabbage too. The stinging nettles were used more for health purposes as they were thought to clean the blood, they were also boiled for this as well. Apparently they tasted quite nice. Of course in the famine the poor people ate nettles and some even tried eating grass to survive.

Post Reply